Skip to main content

Full text of "National testimonial to William Lloyd Garrison [manuscript]"

See other formats


NATIONAL TESTIMONIAL TO WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON. 



THE accomplishment of the Great Work of Emancipation in the United States directs our minds to the 
duty of some fit public recognition of the man who must in all future time be regarded as its visible 
leader. 

William Lloyd Gabeisox, then in the twenty-sixth year of his age, established the " Liberator " 
newspaper in 1831 ; and thenceforward devoted his abilities and his career to the promotion of "immediate 
and unconditional emancipation." After the lapse of thirty-five years of the most exacting labor, of con- 
troversy, peril, and misconception, he has been permitted to see the object gained, to which he, at first 
almost alone, consecrated his life. The generation which immediately preceded ours regarded him only 
as a wild enthusiast, a fanatic, or a public enemy. The present generation sees in him the bold and honest 
reformer, the man of original, self-poised, heroic will, inspired by a vision of universal justice, made actual 
in the practice of nations ; — who-, daring to- attack without reserve the worst and most powerful oppression 
of his country and his time, has outlived the Giant Wrong he assailed and has triumphed over the 
sophistries by which it was maintained. 

In this difficult and perilous work, his labors have- been so exclusively directed to the single aim of the 
overthrow of American Slavery, and so absorbing and severe, that, with abilities capable of winning for- 
tune as well as reputation, he is now, in respect to worldly honors and emoluments, as he was at the com- 
mencement of his career. 

We ask simply to arrest the attention of the American people to the obligations they owe to this 
American. 

Although he contended for the rights of human nature, — and thus, in a degree, made mankind his 
constituency — yet here was the field of his enterprise, and ours was the land to be immediately redeemed. 

He was the advocate of no private interest, he was the representative of no sect or party; with no 
hope of worldly profit to be reaped from the measures and the principles he urged, he was the conspicuous, 
the acknowledged, the prophetic leader of the movement in behalf of the American Slave — now 
consummated by the Edict of Universal Emancipation. 

It cannot mar the dignity of his position as a man of honest, intellectual, and moral independence, to 
receive a substantial testimonial of the good-will and grateful respect of his friends and countrymen; nor 
can it be more than an honorable recognition on the part of the uncounted multitudes of all parties and 
sections, who must confess themselves to have become his debtors — to give to him such a testimonia 
and to make it substantial. 



2 



We, the undersigned, do therefore invito all people who rejoice in the destruction of Slavery, in the 
re-establishment of the Union on the basis of Universal Freedwff, who appreciate his past service -in the 
cause of Liberty, and the dignity and judgment with which he has accepted and interpreted the more 
recent events of public history, — to unite with us in presenting a national testimonial, of not less than 
Fifty Thousand Dollars, to our fellow countryman — William Lloyd Garrison. 

April 25, 1866. 



VnJVvXb- 



Gov. of Mass. 


Lt. Gov. 


h 


Chief Just 


ce, Mass 


XI. S. Sen. 


Mass. 


M. a 


)> 


M. C. 


>i 


m. a 


M 


m. a 


)' 


m. a 


it 


M. c. 


!I 


M. c. 


,, 


m. a 


1) 


Boston , 


„ 


ji 


II 


Concord^ 


)l 


Amesbary, 


)J 


Cambridge 


)) 



ALEX. H. BULLOCK, 

WILLIAM CLAFLIN, 

GEO. TYLER BIGELOW, 

HENRY WILSON, 

JOHN B. ALLEY, 

OAKES AMES, 

JOHN D. BALDWIN, 

NATII'L P. BANKS, 

GEO. S. BOUTWELL, 

THOS. D. ELIOT, 

S. HOOPER, 

ALEX. H. RICE, 

J. M. FORBES, 

JOHN G. PALFREY, 

R. W. EMERSON, 

JOHN G. WHITTIER, 

HENRY W. LONGFELLOW, 

J. R. LOWELL, 

F. J. CHILD, 

CHAS. ELIOT NORTON, 

JAMES SPEED, 

SAMUEL FESSENDEN, 

I. WASHBURN, Jox., 

W. P. FESSENDEN, 

DANIEL CLARK, 

LUKE P. POLAND, 

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM, 

, L. F. S. FOSTER, 

H. B. ANTHONY, 
FRANCIS C. BARLOW, 
WM. C BRYANT, 
-f JACKSON S. SHULTZE, 
GEORGE W. BLUNT, 
CHARLES BUTLER, I 1- I 

HORACE GREELEY, 
•f- FRAN. G. SHAW, 
-f JOHN E. WILLIAMS, 
-f R. W. WESTON, 
^ GEORGE CABOT WARD, 

S. J. BACON, 
•jL WM. A. HALL. „ 

•JlLE G. B. CANNON, A • 3 /S, „ S t/t ^V^J>-^^J>D 
D D. T. MARSHALL, A • /2 3 „ <?. 34 '-- 






1 

V 



NvT-y-JE- — ■ 



PelerboroyN. Y. 
Syracuse, ,, 



M. C, Pa. 

M. 6., „ 

See. of V. S. Senate, Pa. 

Philadelphia. 



Att'y Gen. XI. 


s. 


Ky. 


Portland, Me 






Ex- Gov. „ 






XI. S. Senate, 


Mi 




)] 


N. 


H. 


JT 


VI. 




Gov. of Conn 






PresH of XI. S 


Senate, Conn 


XI. S. Senate, 


S. 


I. 


Sec. of State, 


New York. 


New York. 








s. 


m*^ 



3y-£~4h^_ 



a , 



GEORGE WILLIAM CURTIS, New York. 
RUSH C. HAWKINS, Jf/e „ ^^v-6e, JUnt^A, 

-J SINCLAIR TOUSEY, „ 

VINCENT COLYER, / O $" j; f^JZjzo'fcesTS- 

• WUPHIiN - HYATT, f"«" „ &iA( » B l P^h > -*- < • »-' f t ^ - 

JAMES McKAYE, jftj , K A 

y FRED. LAW OLMSTED, 

SYDNEY HOWARD GAY, 
Y TUEODOUE T1LTON, 
f EDWIN LV-emUUtN'. 
^ GERHIT SMITH, 

, SAMUEL J. MAY, 

_, 0. B. SEDGWICK, 
— 'ANDREW D. WHITE, 
THADDEUS STEVENS, 
WM. D. KELLE^fl^ 
JOHN W. FORNEY, 
JOSEPH HARRISON, 
-f E. W. CLARK, 
-+JAME3 A. WRIGHT, 

WM. H. FURNESS, 
^■SAMUEL S. WHITE, 
-^WILLIAM SELLERS, 
-yJOHN SELLERS, Jcx., 
tl'HOMAS GARRETT, 
HUGH L. BOND, 
WM. J. ALBERT, 
B. F. WADE, ■ - 
J. M. ASHLEY, 
JAMES A. GARFIELD, 
Z. CHANDLER, , 
J. M. HOWARD, 
GEORGE W. JULIAN, 
E. B. WASHBURNE, 
"V G. HAMMOND, 
JAMES W. GRIMES, 
TIMO. 0. HOWE, 
J. B. HENDERSON, 
" S. C. POMEROY, 
' JAMES W. NYE, 
JOHN CONNESS, 
GEO. H. WILLIAMS. 



Wilmington, Del. 
Baltimore, Md. 

Ohk 



V. S. Senate, 
31. C. „ 

M. C. ^ „ 
U. S. Senate, Mich. 
V. S. Senate, „ 
M. C, Ind. 

m. a, in. 

Chicago, 111. 
JJ. S. Senate, Iowa. 
V. S. Senate, Wis. 
V. S. Senate, Missouri. 
V. S. Senate, Kansas. 
U. S. Senate, Nevada. 
U. S. Senate, California. 
V. S. Senate, Oregon. 



.nr» 



[Letter from Chief Justice CJiase.] 

WASHINGTON, April 11, 1866. 
Dear Sir, 

I am glad that you and others have taken in hand the project of a testimonial to Mr. Garrison. His earnest and 
disinterested labors in the great cause of Emancipation, of which he may almost be said to be the pioneer, may be most fitly 
so recognized. His best reward is the triumph of the cause, achieved already, though not yet perfected ; but let there be 
added to that most precious sense of grand results from work nobly done, sueh a recognition by the people, as will be equally 
honorable to them and to him. 

Yours very truly, 

S. P. CHASE. 

Hon. Charles Sumner, in a letter to the Committee, says : " Mr. Garrison's sublime dedication of himself all 
alone to this cause, at a moment when it was disregarded, can never be forgotten in the history of this country. I trust that 
no effort will be spared to carry out the idea of securing an honorable token of the grateful sentiments which his name must 
always inspire among the friends of Human Rights." 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

JOHN A. ANDREW, Chairman. EDMUND QUINCY. 

J. INGERSOLL BOWDITCH. THOMAS RUSSELL. 

S. E. SEWALL. WILLIAM E. COFFIN. 

R. C. WATERSTON. WILLIAM ENDICOTT, Jun., Treasurer 

SAMUEL MAY, Jun., Secretary and Assistant Treasurer. 

Communications and remittances may be made to Rev. Samuel Mat, jun., Box 3605, Boston, Mass.